Student Disability Services

 

Faculty FAQ

  1. Do I have to provide the accommodations listed on the Letter of Accommodation?
  2. Is there a specific time line students must follow for requesting accommodations?
  3. Don't accommodations give students with disabilities an unfair advantage over other students?
  4. One of the student's accommodations is the ability to record lectures. I don't allow digital recorders in the classroom.
  5. I have a student in my class whose first language is not English. The student needs extra time on tests, should I send the student to SDS?

1. Do I have to provide the accommodations listed on the Letter of Accommodation?

Yes. By law, CSI is obligated to provide the accommodations listed on the Letter of Accommodation. However, if you feel that the accommodations fundamentally alter the academic integrity of your course, we can discuss those situations on a case-by-case basis.

If you ever have questions or concerns regarding accommodations please contact the SDS Coordinator.

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2. Is there a specific time line students must follow for requesting accommodations?

No. While we strongly encourage students to set up accommodations at the beginning of the semester, a student might choose to try the class without accommodations. Also, some students find out mid to late semester that they have a disability or that services are available.

Accommodations begin when a student delivers the accommodation letter to you—accommodations are not retroactive.

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3. Don't accommodations give students with disabilities an unfair advantage over other students?

Accommodations give students with disabilities equal access to the classroom. For example, a student who has a learning disability and processes written material more slowly might have extra time on tests. The extra time allows the student to read and re-read the test questions, process the content of the question, and develop an answer to the question. This allows the student to be graded on the content of the answer, not how quickly the answer was produced.

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4. One of the student's accommodations is the ability to record lectures. I don't allow digital recorders in the classroom.

Students with disabilities might need to use auxillary aids to access material in the classroom. One such type of auxillary aid specified in Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act is a tape recorder. A student who processes information slowly might have a recorder as an accommodation. Recording the class allows the student to focus on listening during class and not divide her/his concentration trying to take notes. After class, the student can re-listen to the lecture as many times as necessary and take notes from the recording. If you are covering sensitive material, reviewing a recently given test, or other situation where you do not wish students to record (either on tape or in writing), you may request all students to put down pencils and turn off recording devices. However, if you allow students without accommodations to take notes, you must allow a student whose accommodation includes recording lectures to do so.

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5. I have a student in my class whose first language is not English. The student needs extra time on tests, should I send the student to SDS?

While English as a second language might be a disadvantage for a student taking your class, it is not a disability. Unless a student has a documented disability, the SDS has no authority to authorize adjustments. However, Professors can allow extra time and proctor the tests if they feel it is appropriate.

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